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Window 10 from Window 7 - impact on excel macro

ThrottleWorks

Excel Ninja
Hi,

My company is moving to Window 10 from Window 7.
I do not know if this will have impact on the excel macro we have created.
Can anyone please help me in this. Will there be any impact of excel macros.
 

Belleke

Active Member
Hi ThrottleWorks,
My Company did the same, we didn't have problems in office with Win 7 to Win 10.
Changing from Office 32 to Office 64, that is something else, if you don't use office files with more than 2GB, stay with the office 32 version.
Edit: missed Marc L response
 
Last edited by a moderator:

GraH - Guido

Well-Known Member
Depending on the need, but I would go for Office 64 bit too. The MS advise to go for 32 bit is more out of precaution (backwards VBA compatibility is a main issue, but there are alternatives for those macro, you need to change - a lot of? - code from what I hear).
The Power Pivot/Query teams will almost always say you must have 64 bit on board. We did receive that same reply a couple of times on our queries.
It will allow you handle about 4 billion times more data on a machine with 4 GB free memory. If big(er) data come in to play, it is effectively a no-brainer. Our files were far below 2GB, but the issue was the availability of memory. I understood that the same max filesize applies for 64 bit. That might be a misguidance or an out-dated reference.
Or use Office 32 bit as before next to PowerBI 64 bit for those occasions with big data. The desktop version is still free I believe. A few features are disabled though, but it changes so fast I can't follow.
It seems that most companies stick to 32bit. I can't help but wonder if Microsoft would change their general advise, if the situation would remain so. Do companies really evaluate the need of the employees using the MSO or to go fast do they just follow along MS' advise and avoid some hassle. We did move from 16 to 32 bit also. Things stopped working too then. We got over it.
 

shrivallabha

Excel Ninja
Only thing I will suggest is if possible:
- Discuss with your IT and get a test workstation before user transition happens.
- Test all macros which you think are critical if they work the same way as before. If not fix them.

This will give you smoother transition.
 

Marc L

Excel Ninja
but there are alternatives for those macro, you need to change - a lot of? - code from what I hear).
Sometimes yes but often no alternative for some ActiveX, add-ins, …
So for those who don't use VBA they can go to Excel 64 bits
specially for huge data
(even if Access is at least 50 times faster for huge data than Excel)
but for the others like shrivallabha just wrote
the better is a test workstation before migrating all computers …
 

Chihiro

Excel Ninja
There are few things, some clipboard code has issue in Windows 10, and other relatively obscure issue reported, but by and large, VBA isn't impacted by move to Windows 10.

Going 64 bit... As recommended by Shrivallabha, have IT set up test station and have all stake-holders test their process/application.

IT at my previous company shipped 10 PC with 64bit Office installed, without any test. We had mysql backend with 32bit Access frontend (using runtime)... serving as employee performance & RnR database. It obviously wasn't able to use 32bit Access when 64bit was installed.

I had the misfortune of needing to uninstall all and creating clean drive image...
 

shrivallabha

Excel Ninja
There are few things, some clipboard code has issue in Windows 10, and other relatively obscure issue reported, but by and large, VBA isn't impacted by move to Windows 10.

Going 64 bit... As recommended by Shrivallabha, have IT set up test station and have all stake-holders test their process/application.

IT at my previous company shipped 10 PC with 64bit Office installed, without any test. We had mysql backend with 32bit Access frontend (using runtime)... serving as employee performance & RnR database. It obviously wasn't able to use 32bit Access when 64bit was installed.

I had the misfortune of needing to uninstall all and creating clean drive image...
I know the pain as it is lesson learned hard way.

When Windows 7 replaced Windows XP we had much trouble with our 3D CAD package as it didn't work with Win 7. So we had to first upgrade all projects to newer version of software but then customization started causing troubles so we spent close to 45 days rewriting most of the old code. Transition was a messy affair.

Edit: As an aside, it can become just another topic of discussion as to what levels of software customization a company should do and maintain.
 

GraH - Guido

Well-Known Member
Sometimes yes but often no alternative for some ActiveX, add-ins, …​
3rd party add-ins can be pesky, I try not to use them, though some are very useful and make life easier for users. I was unaware of ActiveX code having no alternative in 64bit. I also do not use it.
I imagine also Access runs better in 64bit when confronted with larger data sets.
 
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