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How to remove all cells containing John (or anything else) [Quick tip]

How to remove all cells containing John (or anything else) [Quick tip]

Here is an interesting question someone asked me recently,

If I have to delete all rows with “John” in it. Do you know how to do it?

Well, it looks like they really hate John. But it is none of my business.

So lets go ahead and understand a dead-simple way to get rid of all cells with John or whoever else you fancy.

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Finding Conversion ratio using Pivot Table Calculated Items

Finding Conversion ratio using Pivot Table Calculated Items

Today, lets understand how to use Calculated items feature in Pivot tables. We will use a practical problem many of us face to learn this feature – ie calculating conversion ratio from a list of sales calls.

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Work with several Excel files everyday? – Save them as a workspace [Quick tip]

Work with several Excel files everyday? – Save them as a workspace [Quick tip]

If you work with multiple Excel workbooks everyday, then here is a handy tip.

Use Save workspace feature to save your workbook collection & layout.

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Use Advances vs. Declines chart to understand change in values

Use Advances vs. Declines chart to understand change in values

Lets say you are responsible for sales of 100s of products (which belong to handful of categories). You are looking at sales of each product in last month & this month. And you want to understand whether sales are improving or declining by category. How would you do it?

Turns out, this is not a difficult problem. In fact, this question is asked every day & answered using Advances vs. Declines chart.

You may have seen this chart in financial newspapers or websites. Shown above, Advances vs. Declines chart tells us how many items have advanced & how many have declined.

Read on to learn how to create this chart using Excel.

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Last day for enrollments – Join our Power Pivot course & become awesome analyst

Hurry up, Enrollments for Power Pivot online classes closing in few hours - Join nowHi folks,

I have a quick announcement & an awesome Power Pivot technique to share with you. First the announcement.

Only few hours left to join our Power Pivot course…

As you may know, I have opened enrollments for our inaugural batch of Power Pivot course few days ago. The aim of this course is to make you awesome in Excel, Advanced Excel, Dashboards & Power Pivot.

We will be closing the doors of this program at midnight, today (11:59 PM, Pacific time, Friday, 15th of February).

If you want to join us, click here and enroll now.

How many people have joined the class?

At the time of writing this, we have 195 students enrolled in Power Pivot class. We are eager to share Power Pivot knowledge & techniques to as many more of you as possible. So go ahead and join us because you want to be awesome in Excel & Power Pivot.

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Love letters to Chandoo.org

Love letters to Chandoo.org

Hi folks,

Today is valentines day. So I thought I should share a few love letters I recently got.

Correction: These letters are not for me, but for our site – Chandoo.org

Addendum: Don’t write me off yet. In my college days I did get all of 17 love letters, mostly because campus postman mistook me (room number 79) for the six foot athletic hunk in room number 29.

While I may not get cat calls & suggestive remarks when I walk on the street, Chandoo.org, the site would totally be kissed and hugged by people of all sexes and ages (well 21 and above).

You see, our site is like Ryan Gosling of Excel websites (or Mila Kunis). Those of slightly older can imagine Chandoo.org as George Clooney or Marissa Tomei of the data analysis world.

How else can I explain the barrage of love letters I get for Chandoo.org?

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Shading above or below a line in Excel charts [tutorial]

Shading above or below a line in Excel charts [tutorial]

When comparing 2 sets of data, one question we always ask is,

  • How is first set of numbers different from second set?

A classic example of this is, lets say you are comparing productivity figures of your company with industry averages. Merely seeing both your series as lines (or columns etc.) is not going to tell you the full story. But if we can shade our productivity line in red or green when it is under or above industry average… now that would be awesome! Something like above.

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